Applying a lens to a lensless photographic process invites an investigation of detail, like a scientist using a microscope. The magnifying glass mimics a petri dish, a place where cells are explored, altered, created, and studied. The process by which these “cells” are created is known as the chemigram, an experimental photographic process through which images are made using resists on light-sensitive paper. Each "cell" created in this process represents a living organism, whether it be a plant, animal, human, or disease. These works expose our interconnectedness through a photographic scope, much in the same way scientists study our anatomy and cellular makeup. At a point in this process the outcome is uncontrollable, the paper and chemicals creating color that seems to have a mind of its own. The role chance plays in the work stands as a metaphor for the biological rhythms we are all a part of.
       
     
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 Chemigram mounted on wood with magnifying glass
       
     
 Applying a lens to a lensless photographic process invites an investigation of detail, like a scientist using a microscope. The magnifying glass mimics a petri dish, a place where cells are explored, altered, created, and studied. The process by which these “cells” are created is known as the chemigram, an experimental photographic process through which images are made using resists on light-sensitive paper. Each "cell" created in this process represents a living organism, whether it be a plant, animal, human, or disease. These works expose our interconnectedness through a photographic scope, much in the same way scientists study our anatomy and cellular makeup. At a point in this process the outcome is uncontrollable, the paper and chemicals creating color that seems to have a mind of its own. The role chance plays in the work stands as a metaphor for the biological rhythms we are all a part of.
       
     

Applying a lens to a lensless photographic process invites an investigation of detail, like a scientist using a microscope. The magnifying glass mimics a petri dish, a place where cells are explored, altered, created, and studied. The process by which these “cells” are created is known as the chemigram, an experimental photographic process through which images are made using resists on light-sensitive paper. Each "cell" created in this process represents a living organism, whether it be a plant, animal, human, or disease. These works expose our interconnectedness through a photographic scope, much in the same way scientists study our anatomy and cellular makeup. At a point in this process the outcome is uncontrollable, the paper and chemicals creating color that seems to have a mind of its own. The role chance plays in the work stands as a metaphor for the biological rhythms we are all a part of.

DSC_0602.jpg
       
     
DSC_0604.jpg
       
     
DSC_0605.jpg
       
     
DSC_0606.jpg
       
     
 Chemigram mounted on wood with magnifying glass
       
     

Chemigram mounted on wood with magnifying glass